Join List
Buy Wine

Great article from our friend Elaine Brown on the Jancis Robinson website, here is a little snippet:


‘Green Valley is the most prolific [of the West Sonoma Coast subzones] in styles, wine types, and producers’, Paul Sloan, viticulturist and winemaker of Small Vines, explains. He’s been farming the region since the late 1990s. Even more impressive is that even within the range of styles, a Green Valley signature still shines through. 


Our wines reviewed:


  • 2013 Chardonnay Sonoma Coast – 16.5 

Natural fruit-spiced warming aromatics and palate. All about the spice moving into a long finish. Fresh clean fruit, creamy Meyer lemon with hints of lime. Lots of presence, and freshness. Will age and develop nicely.

  • 2013 Estate Cuvée Pinot Noir Russian River Valley – 17

Notes of mixed fresh berries, natural spice and pine forest through the finish with a mineral crunch. There is nice density and depth here. This Pinot shows off the sophisticated structure and flavour nuance of the vintage. Will develop nicely.

  • 2012 Sonoma Coast Pinot Noir – 16.5

Chiseled, savoury rose leaf and cream and a saline crunch. Nice flavour concentration, structural tension, and fruit purity. Long mouth-watering finish.

  • 2012 MK Vineyard Pinot Noir – 16+

Savoury with a saline crunch. Notes of dried rose petal, and herbs smudged with spice. Lots of lifting energy, flavour concentration without heaviness, and clean focus. A little more breadth and depth to the palate than the other Small Vines Pinots. This wine wants the most time in bottle to develop.

  • 2012 Estate Cuvée Pinot Noir Russian River Valley – 16+

Savoury red fruit with integrated spice, and a long mineral crunch. A bit muted but opens with air. Nice flavour concentration without heaviness. Mouth-watering acidity with persistent tannin, and an ultra-long finish.


To read the article in full, click here (subscription required)

Press Democrat Logo

Smaller, better in Sebastopol

BY PEG MELNIK- October 25, 2014

Small Vines Wines owner Paul Sloan works on special imported tractors from Europe designed to work in his narrowly planted vines. (JOHN BURGESS/ PD)

Small Vines Wines owner Paul Sloan works on special imported tractors from Europe designed to work in his narrowly planted vines. (JOHN BURGESS/ PD)

A mysterious apple tree taught Paul Sloan his first lesson in winemaking when he was 10 years old.

“For whatever reason, that tree with the smallest apples had the flavors that were the most intense,” he said.

Today Sloan and his wife, Kathryn, are the vintners of Small Vines, a Sebastopol brand that is based on the Burgundian model of winemaking and vineyard management. The philosophy embraces the practice of getting smaller yields from higher-density, European-styled spacing of vines.

The Sloans say they reap fewer pounds per vine in order to produce higher quality fruit. It’s a nod to the tasty apple tree Sloan grew up with on his family’s 250-acre ranch in Santa Rosa.

The couple sit beneath a grove of redwoods on their property in Sebastopol. It’s a 12.5-acre spread, and they’re in the midst of building a winery not far from their house, the historic Barlow homestead that dates back to 1897.

The Barlows were prominent apple and berry farmers. Today the family name is well known for its apple processing plant in Sebastopol, which has been transformed into a food and wine haven with wineries, retail shops, artisan studios and restaurants in the mix.

Kathryn, 45, said living in a historic house suits the family, most especially their two children: Dakota, 11, and Savannah, 8.

“Instead of a Queen Anne Victorian, it’s a farmhouse. . . . We’re humble farmers. I live in an old house. I wear my grandmother’s ring and we value traditional winemaking methods.”

Small Vines Wines owners Paul and Kathryn Sloan (JOHN BURGESS/ PD)

Small Vines Wines owners Paul and Kathryn Sloan (JOHN BURGESS/ PD)

It all began with a fascination of pinot noir.

Sloan, 42, was a 19-year old busboy at the Kenwood Restaurant, and then owner Susan Schacher had a daily ritual of reveling in a glass of pinot noir at closing time.

“I said to myself, ‘This pinot noir varietal has to be very special,’ ” he said.

In 1993, Sloan began working for John Ash restaurant in Santa Rosa, and within six months he became assistant wine steward there. “There was a wine library at John Ash, and I was really engaged,” Sloan said. “I devoured the books.”

While working at John Ash, Sloan was offered a taste of a $3,000-plus bottle of Burgundy — the Domaine de la Romanee Conti.

“A man poured me a generous glass and he said, ‘Enjoy this throughout the evening. It may just change your life.’ ”

The pricey Burgundy did just that. “Things just started churning inside me and I wanted to make wines of the highest level of purity and authenticity.”

After working for the late Warren Dutton of Sebastopol’s Dutton Ranch and studying viticulture at Santa Rosa Junior College, Sloan was at a crossroads. He was accepted to study at California Polytechnic State University, but he was eager to begin his brand.

Dutton, who mentored the couple, encouraged them to travel to France, since they wanted to follow the lead of the French. After several research trips, the Sloans founded Small Vines in 1998.

The husband and wife team seems to be the perfect yin-yang for the operation. Sloan covers farming and winemaking, while Kathryn tackles the business side of the operation. Meanwhile, both continue to be adventuresome, which isn’t surprising considering they began their courtship as rock climbers.

“Paul is one big adventurer,” said Kathryn. “Rock climbing, surfing, scuba diving. It’s hard to keep up with this farmer who has a lot of energy.”

Small Vines Wines owners Paul and Kathryn Sloan imported special tractors from Europe designed to work in the narrowly planted vines.

Small Vines Wines owners Paul and Kathryn Sloan imported special tractors from Europe designed to work in the narrowly planted vines.

The Press Democrat online article can be found here:

Hurricane Odile hit Cabo San Lucas on September 14, 2014. Depending on where you live or where you get your news from, you might not be aware of the devastation it wrought on one of the most beautiful and popular tourist destinations the Pacific coast has to offer.

I, myself, have been going to Cabo for eight years–ever since my family went in on a timeshare at one of the many beachfront resorts. Like most, we immediately fell for the scenery and the people on our very first trip. We’ve gone back every year. Each time it keeps getting better. This year’s vacation, however, was different.

After a record early and fast grape harvest, my girlfriend and I were ready for a break. And we couldn’t think of a better way to get away than to head down to the family timeshare, leave the phones and computers at home, and drink margaritas and sleep on the beach all day.

We landed in paradise on Saturday at midday. First thing was first: we got our bags, found the nearest spot selling ice-cold Coronas, we officially entered vacation mode.

photo 30

We took a 45-minute shuttle to the resort. There was music playing in the courtyard, kids running and jumping into the pool, and the pristine beach and crystal clear turquoise water stretching as far as the eye could see. It was so beautiful it looked fake–like a mirage or a painting.

photo 31photo 34photo 35photo 32

If you’ve read the headlines, you know that our relaxing vacation plans didn’t last long. Word quickly spread that Hurricane Odile was shifting direction and heading straight for us. So instead of searching for the perfect margarita, we headed to Wal-Mart to stock up on the essentials: beer, tequila, limes, and oh yeah, something for dinner.

There wasn’t much to complain about after night one. Sure there was a bit of rain, but no matter, when we woke up, it was back to normal vacation.

Hurricane Odile , a Class 4 hurricane with 145 mph winds, was the worst hurricane to ever hit Cabo San Lucas. At about seven in the evening on our second night, the front desk called our room and gave us two options: stay in the back of your room in the bathroom or take shelter in the gym on the other side of the resort.

I know what you’re thinking–obviously, we opted for the shelter. Wrong. We were already in the bathroom and quite frankly, the thought of going outside and running across the resort–also known as ground zero of the impending hurricane–didn’t sound so appealing. Just in case, we had our backpacks packed with our passports, money and some food and water.

The storm got stronger as the night wore on. Around nine o’clock, I peered through the sliding glass door that faced the beach and saw what could be best described as a scene out of a Hollywood disaster movie. Palm trees snapped like toothpicks, debris blew in all directions and the waves crashed all the way over the sea wall to the resort.

Over the next agonizingly slow hour, we heard some of the loudest and scariest noises we had ever heard or hope to hear in our lives. The building was swaying and our ears were popping from the different pressures being created from the suctions throughout the resort’s building. But that was just the beginning. The scariest part of Hurricane Odile was yet to come.

We were sitting on the bed talking–yelling, really–doing our best to distract ourselves from what was going on around us. Then we heard the unmistakable sound of glass shattering. I took a peek out the bedroom and saw the drapes to the sliding glass door blowing like flags on a ridiculously windy day.  Not only was sliding glass door ko’d, it had been completely ripped out from the frame. The gym shelter was sounding better and better. We grabbed what we could and went across the hall to the neighbors’ room, which was more protected facing away from the wind towards the next resort.

As we all frantically discussed what was going on, we heard another loud bang from our room. We looked across the hall and the main key-entry door to our room had been ripped off its hinges. It fluttered around like a piece of tissue paper.

In the midst of all this, I remembered one of the most important things still in our room. The wine. A 2012 Small Vines Wines Estate Cuvee and a 2013 Rosé of Pinot Noir. Odile was scary enough to put the fear in you, but she wasn’t going to keep me from these babies. Damn the 145 mph winds. I brought those Small Vines Wines to Cabo and I was going to drink them.

I ran back into our room. After each step, I could hear the crunch from the broken glass. It took longer than I’d wanted, but I found them. Wine in hand, I scurried back to the neighbors’ room.

The next morning, we witnessed the aftermath. Rooms and hallways had been flooded. Water dripped from the ceiling. Broken glass and upturned furniture were everywhere, and outside was even worse. The resort lost windows, shingles, palm trees looked as if they’d been thrown around like twigs and we could see different sections of the restaurant littered across the grounds.

photo 4 photo 6 photo 7

No one knew what to do. There was collective shock amongst the guests and the staff. Nobody expected the hurricane to hit that hard and that fast. Luckily, there was a backup generator, but most of the diesel had spilled into the ocean. That translucent turquoise water? It was now a splotchy mess of black and brown.

photo 8photo 9

The days immediately following Hurricane Odile were some of the most stressful and scariest parts of the entire disaster. All of the nearby stores  had been looted. Local police were nowhere to be found. The federal police came through, but they seemed to have no intentions to stop the looting. People started burning bonfires in the streets to keep the looters at bay. Thick smoke wafted above the city. From the right angle, Cabo looked like a war zone.

On September 17, four days after we arrived, we were told an evacuation plan had been hatched to transport tourists to either Tijuana, Mazatlán, Guadalajara, or Mexico City. Nobody had a choice or a clue where they’d be heading, which isn’t exactly the kind of thing you want to hear when you’re in Mexico.

With the immediate future anything but clear, we decided it was time for something we could depend on. It was time for the wine.

photo 10 photo 15 photo 16

On Thursday morning, we took a shuttle to the airport. The ride provided us our first chance to get a glimpse of the real extent of the damage. Complete neighborhoods were gone. Streets were destroyed, cars and boats were tipped over onto their sides. There’s nothing quite like seeing a place right after a hurricane has struck.

The new and old airport terminals were destroyed. The air traffic control tower was demolished and there were close to 20,000 people  standing in line, waiting, suffering under the hot sun. We stood like that for six hours.

photo 21 photo 22 photo 23photo 29 photo 24

Around two o’clock, we started to move. We took the first ticket they handed us. Dallas. We grabbed a connecting flight to San Francisco and finally, finally! We were home.

photo 26photo 27

It’s a feeling of relief to be back on solid ground. To return home after a vacation is always nice. It was especially nice after the experience we’d just gone through. But there are thousands of families in Cabo who have no relief. No homes to go back to.

Project Smiles has created a donation fund to help the Cabo community by delivering food, clothes and medical supplies. I hope you’ll consider donating and returning the favor to a community that has been so gracious to millions of families.

Other donation sites can be found here:

2012 SC CH

Small Vines Wines 2012 Sonoma Coast Chardonnay

This post is a bit late, due to some re-configuring and redesigning of our new website and blog, as well as harvest and some vacation, but who is making up excuses.

We are proud to show off our second Wine of the Week honorable mention from Peg Melnik in the Press Democra with the 2012 Small Vines Wine Sonoma Coast Chardonnay!

This exceptional Chardonnay is 100% from our Barlow Homestead Vineyard. From obsessively tended vines, it expresses a distinct sense of place. It confidently delivers pleasing minerality with subtle richness.

We only have a handful of cases of the 2012 Sonoma Coast Chardonnay. Order yours today at

Press Democrat- Wine of the Week: Roederer Estate Brut

Wine of the Week: Scouting for the tastiest whites to celebrate summer’s end

Wine writer Peg Melnik had a blind tasting this week with a flight of white wines to relish the final days of summer. Bottlings included a broad range, from sparklers to chardonnays to sauvignon blancs. Our wine-of-the-week winner is the Roederer Estate, N.V. Anderson Valley Brut at $24.


Roederer Estate, N.V. Anderson Valley Brut, 12 percent alcohol, $24. ★★★★ An elegant sparkler with complex notes of pear, hazelnut and mineral. It’s light on its feet with great acidity. Impressive. A smart pick for the price.

Other impressive wines:

Iron Horse, 2009 Green Valley of Russian River Valley, Sonoma County Brut Classic, 13.5 percent, $40. ★★★ 1⁄2 This is a striking sparkler with great complexity and a seamless texture. It’s lush with notes of baked apple, brioche and nut. Nice mousse. Lingering finish. Outstanding.

Ousterhout, 2013 Redwood Ranch, Alexander Valley, Sonoma County Sauvignon Blanc, 13.5 percent, $22. ★★★ 1⁄2 A refreshing sauvignon blanc with a range. Its breath of flavors is what gives this wine its intrigue. Notes of grapefruit, mango, papaya and lemon peel. Bright finish. Tasty.

Small Vines, 2012 Sonoma Coast, Sonoma County Chardonnay,13.8 percent, $53. ★★ 1⁄2 A tasty chardonnay with depth. It has bright fruit, good minerality and crisp acidity. Seamless and complex.

La Crema, 2013 Monterey Pinot Gris, 13.5 percent, $20. ★★★ A tropical pinot gris with aromas of pineapple, apricot and lemon zest. Bright acidity. Nice length. A refreshing summer pick.

Small Vines Wines 2012 Sonoma Coast Pinot Noir

Small Vines Wines 2012 Sonoma Coast Pinot Noir

We are happy to announce that our 2012 Sonoma Coast Pinot Noir was recommended as an honorable mention in The Press Democrat’s Wine of the Week feature by the fantastic writer Peg Melnik. 

The 2012 Sonoma Coast Pinot Noir is made 100% from our Barlow Homestead Vineyard, which was planted in 2009. This amazing young site is already expressing itself in the wines showing great acidity, evident tannins, minerality and even some distinct savory characteristics. Sexy, spice-tinged red fruit and floral aromas show very good clarity. The estate grapes are organically grown with a yield of about 1.5-2 lbs per vine with 4 ft by 3 ft spacing. 

With only 175 cases produced, this wine is sure to sell out. Be sure to order yours today at

Press Democrat- Wine of the week: Pinot noir catches flavors of the Carneros


Truchard, 2012 Carneros, Napa Valley Pinot Noir, 14.1 percent alcohol, $35. ★★★A crisp pinot that wins you over with its breezy approachability. The wine is complex, and yet unfussy. Bing cherry meets bright acidity. Great balance. A smart food pick.

Other impressive wines

Merry Edwards, 2011 Meredith Estate, Russian River Valley Pinot Noir, 14.4 percent, $57. ★★ 1⁄2 A pinot with intensity. Aromas and flavors of black cherry, herbs and spice. Has an appealing earthiness. This wine has depth. Top rate.

Small Vines, 2012 Sonoma Coast, Sonoma County Pinot Noir,13.2 percent, $55. ★★ This is a tasty pinot noir with complexity. It has generous fruit – raspberry and cherry – and good bones or structure. Great minerality. Impressive.

Rodney Strong, 2012 Russian River Valley, Sonoma County Pinot Noir, 14.5 percent, $25. ★★★ An elegant pinot noir with layered flavors. What’s most appealing is its bright cherry fruit and its silky texture. There’s also a tasty note of vanilla in the mix. A smart pick.

Edna Valley, 2011 Paragon Central Coast Pinot Noir, 13.9 percent, $20. ★★★ 1⁄2 A tasty pinot with aromas and flavors of cherry, plum, pomegranate and spicy oak. Budget-savvy for the quality of this pinot.

We were pleased to welcome writer Elaine Chukan Brown from the fantastic blog, Hawk Wakawaka Wine Reviews, to Small Vines Wines for fruit thinning and wine tasting with our very own Vigneron, Paul Sloan, and co-owner, Kathryn Sloan.

Elaine has become one of the most recognized names in the wine and food blogging world with her wine review blog, Hawk Wakawaka Wine Reviews. She recently has been named by Imbibe Magazine an Imbibe 75 “Person to Watch”, as well as becoming a Best Food Blog Award Finalist by Saveur Magazine. Her amazing work has been recommended several times by The New York Times Diner’s Journal, and in both The Washington Post, and The Los Angeles Times.  Her wine blog has been a finalist in six categories at the Wine Blog Awards including the 2014 Wine Blog Awards Best Overall Wine Blog.

As the morning West Sonoma County fog slowly burned away, we greeted Elaine at our Barlow Homestead Vineyard. Little did she know, we had plans to begin fruit thinning our vineyards that day. With a camera around her neck, pruning shears in one hand and a pencil and notebook in the other, off we walked into our High-Density Pinot Noir Barlow Homestead Vineyard for the first fruit thinning pass of over 25 hand vine care passes.


Photo Credit: Elaine Chukan Brown


Photo Credit: Elaine Chukan Brown


Fruit thinning is a method grape growers use in order to better ripen their grape clusters and ensure a higher quality thus creating a complex wine. They do this by evaluating each vine and meticulously dropping the fruit (cutting excess clusters) and leaving them on the ground below to decompose and provide more nutrients for the vines. Timing is crucial, and this method is best done during the beginning stages of veraison, the signal that harvest is between 45 to 60 days away.

Impeccably low-yields (per vine) are vital to improved wine quality in Pinot Noir- and balanced wines are made more easily and more naturally from balanced vines. Small Vines follows the Grand Cru standards from Burgundy, which allows only two grape clusters per shoot, a maximum of 8 shoots per vine and never more than 16 clusters per vine. At a mere 1-2 pounds per vine- a low-vigor, high-density vineyard balances each vine at lower yields, naturally. These small vines produce tiny cluster that have tiny, thick-skinned berries creating concentration and amazing structure in the wines.

After a thorough explanation and demonstration by Paul Sloan, Elaine grasped the sheers and began cautiously sifting through the vine’s shoots. This process can be very nerve-racking for ANY viticulturist due to the anxiety of “throwing away” perfectly good fruit that looks healthy and beautiful just for the sake of exceptional wine quality.

photo 13

photo 3

Small Vines Wines would like to thank Elaine from Hawk Wakawaka for her visit. We love to share our passion for our vineyards and wines and we welcome all who would love to come learn and taste our hand-crafted Pinot Noir, Chardonnay and Rosé of Pinot Noir. For a tasting and vineyard tour with our vigneron, be sure to set up and schedule an appointment at 707-823-0886 or

Photo Credit: Elaine Chukan Brown

We recently received this wonderful review from a Pinot Noir lover who hosted a wine and dinner pairing party in Southwest Florida. They reviewed wines from Sea Smoke Estate Vineyards, Peay Vineyards and also our very own Small Vines Wines all from the 2008, 2009 and 2010 vintages. We would like to thank Linda for writing this great review and loving all of these fantastic California wines. Below is her review.

“On May 18, my husband and I, plus 6 of our wine and food loving friends, had a California Pinot Noir vertical wine tasting and dinner.  They were all 2008, 2009, and 2010 vintages as well as some of our favorites!

We started off with 3 years of Sea Smoke Ten, moved up the coast and poured 3 years of Peay Scallop Shelf, then dove right into Russian River Valley with 3 years of Small Vines Wines.  Of course all of the wines were fabulous and they paired beautifully with everything from wild mushroom soup,  seared tuna, salmon in raspberry glaze, to pork tenderloin in blueberry glacé and grilled lamb chops.  I did have to move over to Napa for dessert as we had a Vineyard 29 Aida late harvest Zinfandel that certainly was delicious with my torta de Barozzi.

Everyone raved about our pinots and rightfully so.  We have visited with both you (Small Vines) and Andy Peay (Peay Vineyards) and love your wines.  While we are not big wine collectors ( just a lowly 500 bottle collection) we always purchase a few every year.  Please keep those great wines coming.

I have attached a few pictures.  Some of us in Southwest Florida really love great wine and food!!!!

Linda, Fort Myers, Florida”

1 2346 5

Stephen Tanzer's International Wine Cellar

Our 2012 wine vintage reviews from Josh Raynolds at Stephen Tanzer’s International Wine Cellar are in. For in-depth professional reviews and scores see the PDF link.

Raynolds’ Reviews of 2012 Vintage 

[polldaddy poll=8079482]

The Latest BURGHOUND.COM Reviews are in!

Small Vines Wines (Sebastopol, CA)
2010 Baranoff Vineyard Russian River Valley Pinot Noir – 91

2010 Russian River Valley  Pinot Noir- 89

2010 MK Vineyard Sonoma Coast Pinot Noir –90

From owners Paul and Kathryn Sloan who founded Small Vines in 1998 with their first release in 2007 (vintage 2005). Their range continues to grow steadily as their new high density planted vineyard holdings come into production. They recommend if you are going to open a bottle young, be sure to decant it.
2010 Pinot Noir: (Russian River Valley, estate grown, 263 cases, SRP $55, 14.2%). An admirably pure and fresh essence of dark cherry and raspberry fruit aromas slides gracefully into delicious and seductively textured medium-bodied flavors. There is plenty of mouth coating extract that imparts a velvety mouth feel to the balanced and lingering finish that offers a perfectly good if not truly special level of complexity. 89/2017+
2010 Pinot Noir – Baranoff Vineyard: (Russian River Valley, vineyard planted in 2001, 100 cases, SRP $72, 14.2%). Here the nose is compositionally similar to that of the straight pinot cuvée but with a bit more spice and overall complexity. The delicious, round and lush medium full flavors possess very good volume and again plenty of mouth coating dry extract, all wrapped in a dusty and well-balanced finish. This is lovely and should amply reward medium to longer-term storage. 91/2018+
2010 Pinot Noir – MK Vineyard: (Sonoma Coast, planted in 1999, 150 cases, SRP $72, 14.1%). This is exceptionally pretty with attractively spicy aromas of plum, black cherry and sandalwood. There is a lovely mouth feel to the extract-rich flavors that are underpinned by ripe tannins on the solidly persistent finish that doesn’t display quite the same depth though it’s entirely possible that more will develop as there is certainly the underlying material to do so. Worth considering. 90/2018+

for the 2008 MK Vineyard
95 points-Pinot Report

“SMART BUY.”2008 Russian River
93 points
-Pinot Report

We are so excited to share with you the most recent reveiws of our 2008 wines!

Here is what the current Pinot Report had to say:

Small Vines Wines Just about anyone who’s active in North Coast Pinot Noir production has heard of Paul and Kathryn Sloan. Their vineyard farming and development company, Small Vines Viticulture, has earned the young couple quite a bit of attention for its application and adaptation of Burgundian viticultural techniques and sustainable practices to California vineyards. With the success of their vineyard management, Paul and Kathryn decided to apply what they have learned about growing Sonoma Coast and Russian River Valley Pinot Noir and set out to make their own artisan Pinot Noir. Current Pinot bottlings include regional Russian River Valley and Sonoma Coast Pinots and a vineyard designate from the MK Vineyard. These are delicious Pinots made with care and passion by terrific people.

Small Vines Pinot Noir Russian River Valley 2008 Medium-deep ruby color; deep, intense red cherry, spice and cola aromas; rich, ripe, complex red cherry and berry flavors with spice and cola notes; some oak; silky texture; good structure and balance; long finish. Beautifully rich and ripe Pinot that needs a little time in the glass and tastes great while you wait for it.452 cases made $50 Score: 93 

SmallVines PinotNoir Sonoma Coast  MK Vineyard 2008 Medium-deep ruby color;bit closed but deep and complex aromas of dark cherry and forest floor; deep, rich black cherry flavors with lots of complex earthy, forest floor notes: silky texture; nice oak; some tannin; good structure and balance; long finish. Very complex Pinot. Give it at least an hour of air and serve it with a braised meat dish- beef short ribs would be perfect.  147 cases made $65 Score: 95